Events Programme - Wirral Wildlife

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Sunday 19th August

The Beauty Of Heswall’s Heathland

2 - 4 p.m.

We will enjoy a walk through Cleaver Heath and the Heswall Dales, where the heather will be in flower and discuss the flora and fauna of lowland heaths, as well as their management. All the while, we will be enjoying spectacular views across the Dee Estuary. Cleaver Heath nature reserve is owned and managed by Cheshire Wildlife Trust while Heswall Dales Local Nature Reserve is managed by Wirral Borough Council both with the help of volunteers.

To book, please contact the walk leader Alan Irving on 0151 342 2641, leaving a message and return phone number. The maximum practical group size will be 20, on a first-come-first -served basis.

Meet at Cleaver Heath nature reserve on Oldfield Road, Heswall, CH60 6SG. Map of location

Stout footwear is recommended. Please bring waterproof clothing or sun protection (hat, sunscreen, sun-glasses) as appropriate.

Bring binoculars if available (not essential). Sorry, no dogs.

Free but donations welcome.


Friday 14th September

‘Red Squirrels in Wales’

Room B, Heswall Hall, Heswall

7.30 p.m.

A talk by Becky Clews-Roberts, Red Squirrel Ranger for Red Squirrel Trust Wales.

Admission £3. All welcome.


Friday 12th October

Talk - topic to be confirmed

Room B, Heswall Hall, Heswall

7.30 p.m.

A talk by Jeff Clarke, Ecologist.

Admission £3. All welcome.


Friday 9th November

“Underworld Connections: The Ecology of Symbiotic Mycorrhizal Fungi”

Room B, Heswall Hall, Heswall

7.30 p.m.

A talk by Professor David Johnson, University of Manchester.

Symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi are found in virtually all of Earth’s terrestrial ecosystems but remain understudied compared to many other groups of organisms. In this talk, Professor Johnson will describe how these soil-borne symbiotic fungi play crucial roles in regulating numerous ecosystem processes through their interactions with plant roots. He will focus on the importance of measuring their diversity and function, their roles in nutrient cycling in natural ecosystems, and in facilitating plant to plant communication.

Admission £3. All welcome.


Friday 11th January 2019

‘Fire Management of Upland Moors’

Room B, Heswall Hall, Heswall

7.30 p.m.

A talk by Professor Rob Marrs, University of Liverpool.

A hot topic as they say in conservation circles. Upland moors are important habitats not only for conservation as cultural landscapes but also for carbon capture in peat and water provision. Their current management using prescribed fire for grouse is deemed by many conservation bodies to be inappropriate, and they call for a burning ban coupled with wetting up the moors. Alas, it is not so simple as the recent wildfires on the Pennines indicate. Professor Marrs will attempt to provide a balanced view of the issues involved using ongoing research in the North Pennines.

Admission £3. All welcome.